We’re moving!

We thought we would experiment with new platforms and new discussions so…

We’ve passed on to the other side and are now on Tumblr! So follow us on there for all things deathly. Don’t forget, we still have our Facebook page so you can follow us on there too.

So thanks for being with us on WordPress and we look forward to continuing our deathly journey with you on Tumblr.

Dead Social’s Digital Legacy conference

So we attended the rather excellent Digital Legacy conference which was run by Dead Social and hosted by UCL Partners in London on 23rd May. It was free to attend and we learned a huge amount about lots of different things such as, how people are using social media to mourn, what it’s like to go to a virtual wake and whether you should have a Digital Executor named in your will. This will be an annual event so if you missed it this time, keep an eye out for their 2016 event.

Because so much stuff was covered and some people were live-tweeting the talks, we thought we’d do something a little bit different this time around and create a Storify of the event. So…enjoy!

Feel free to ask any questions in the comments and we’ll try to answer them.

Click the image below to head to the Storify!

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Sunday Sundries 8

Image from A.K. Rockefeller on Flickr (CC2.0)

Image from A.K. Rockefeller on Flickr (CC2.0)

It’s that time of the week again when we do a wrap-up of interesting death stuff from around the web:

Yesterday, we had the great pleasure of attending the Digital Legacy Conference in London (a full recap coming soon!) where we heard a range of excellent talks from speakers in the fields of death, medical care and the tech industry on how the digital age is changing dying, grief and memorials. Now let’s all go and make a Social Media Will!  Dead Social has a whole bunch of free tutorials to help you get your digital affairs in order.

In other news, scientists in South Africa may have just found the world’s oldest preserved human skin, on a 2 million year old fossil of Australopithecus sediba. This could offer new insights into our evolutionary ancestry and is possibly the oldest human soft tissue ever discovered.

Hyde Park pet cemetery. Image from "19th century photographs" online. Photographer unknown.

Hyde Park pet cemetery. Image from “19th century photographs” online. Photographer unknown.

The BBC ran an article on the rising popularity of pet cemeteries in the UK. Instead of burying Rover in the back garden, more and more people are looking for a permanent memorial and funeral for their companion animals. Of course, this is not a new thing, as this article on London Insight on the beautiful Victorian Hyde Park pet cemetery shows.

Ever wondered what actually happens to your body after you die? Of course you have! Ars Technica gives you all the details.

Finally, how did we miss this? Everyone’s favourite mortician and founder of the Order of the Good Death, Caitlin Doughty, examines the hidden dead of London along with Dr Lindsey Fitzharris, medical historian and all-round lovely person. Check out Lindsey’s channel, Under the Knife, as well.

Sunday Sundries 7

Image from Buzzfeed.

Image from Buzzfeed.

It’s been a while since we did one of these, but there’s been some interesting articles about death online recently, so here’s what we found this week:

The Death Projects is a brilliant deathly site that we’ve only just come across, and are now happily devouring their articles. Of particular interest was the “6 reasons you should be thinking more about death“. Turns out, a healthy interest in the end of life can make you healthier, happier and more caring as well as giving you a new appreciation of life.

The same site also shared some of the Dalai Lama’s thoughts about death, which are profound even if you’re not a Buddhist:

“I view death as a normal process, a reality that I accept will occur as long as I remain in this earthly existence. Knowing that I cannot escape it, I see no point in worrying about it. I tend to think of death as being like changing your clothes when they are old and worn out, rather than as some final end.”

When I (Ryan) spent some time living and volunteering in North Dakota, I learned that burying the dead in winter was impossible due to the permanently frozen ground. Bodies were kept in a morgue until spring, when the ice thawed, and then burials were held at a rate of several a day. Vice Magazine shares a similar tale of the difficulties of burial in Alaska.

Buzzfeed has a fascinating list of 31 strange and disturbing facts about death. Enjoy!

And finally, a reminder that the Digital Legacy Conference is happening next Saturday (23 May) at UCL, London, looking at death and dying in the modern, digital age. It’s free to attend too!

Deathly days out: Forensics at the Wellcome Collection

Image: Wellcome Collection

Image: Wellcome Collection

How did the first crime scene investigators find clues? What can an autopsy tell us about a person’s last moments? If a body is stuffed into a suitcase, can maggots still get to it?

These questions and more are answered in a brilliantly morbid exhibition at the Wellcome Collection in London (billed as the destination of choice for the “incurably curious”). Forensics: the Anatomy of Crime takes you on a journey over five rooms from crime scene to morgue, to laboratory and courtroom, exploring the many unusual ways forensics experts uncover evidence.

Of course, we at Deathly Ponderings just had to go along! It was utterly fascinating, and provided a rare look at real forensic items and techniques as well as historic photographs and archive material of some of the Victorian era’s most grizzly murders.

Image: Wellcome Collection

Image: Wellcome Collection

Bizarrely, the first thing we saw was an oddly-adorable dolls’ house. On further inspection, it was a mini model of a crime scene, known as a “nutshell study”: a brutal diorama used to teach criminology students in the skills of observation and inference.

The personal highlight for me was the “morgue” room, with specimens of skulls and brains with bullet wounds, and an original marble dissection table from the 1920s. You can sit and gaze at this slab while listening to the squelchy hacking sounds of a recorded autopsy, which makes for quite an unsettling experience.

Videos throughout the exhibit examine some of the questions about the forensics process, including one from the ever-wonderful Carla Valentine of St Bart’s Pathology Museum.

Image: Wellcome Collection

Image: Wellcome Collection

As well as forensics, the exhibit looked at how people respond to death, with sculptures inspired by victims of genocide and the intriguing Japanese art of Kusōzu, delicate paintings showing the body of a young woman in various stages of decomposition.

I don’t want to give too much else away, because this is an exhibition full of fascinating little details and you really need to experience it to get the full sense of being immersed in the world of forensics for a couple of hours. While you’re at the Wellcome Collection, the exhibitions on the other floors are also definitely worth checking out: I recommend the room of miscellanea from Henry Wellcome’s personal collection, including shrunken heads, preserved mummies and Napoleon’s toothbrush.

The exhibition is free and open Tuesdays-Sundays until 21 June. If you’re going to the Digital Legacy Conference looking at death and grief in the digital age, the Wellcome Collection is just around the corner, so you can do both!

Death in Cambridge: Medieval hospital burial ground unearthed

In my professional life, I work for Cambridge University doing media things. This story came up this week, and I thought it had relevance to our deathly interests. Enjoy!

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Archaeological investigations have discovered one of Britain’s largest medieval hospital cemeteries, containing over 1,000 human remains, when excavating beneath the Old Divinity School at St John’s College. One of the largest medieval hospital burial grounds in Britain, containing an estimated 1,300 burials, once stood on the site of what is now part of St John’s College, according to a report published in the latest issue of the Archaeological Journal.

The report marks the first public release of evidence gathered by an archaeological dig beneath the Old Divinity School, conducted as part of the Victorian building’s refurbishment in 2010-2012. The report reveals that the complete skeletal remains of over 400 medieval burials were uncovered by a team from the Cambridge Archaeological Unit, along with “disarticulated” and fragmentary remains of what could be as many as 1,000 more individuals. Images from the dig are available on the St John’s College website HERE.

Continue reading

Celebrating the season

This post was inspired by a quite beautiful conversation that I overheard on a public bus last night. A young girl was asking her mother about a friend of the family who had just died. The girl was confused as to what had happened and the mother was gently explaining how the friend had been ill for some time and that her dying was actually a relief for her.

The girl piped up: “So death is a good thing then?”

Her older sister interjected: “Not always…”

The mother settled things: “Sometimes it is the best thing, especially if someone is suffering. Someone dying can be a good thing and death isn’t always sad”

I’m paraphrasing a lot but in her wonderful education of her children, the mother used “death”, “dying” and “dead” multiple times, never relying on less clear words such as “passed on” or other euphemisms. Her young daughters listened in rapt attention and the younger sister seemed relieved and happy with the outcome of the family friend’s death. She obviously knew her well and her mother’s frank and simple explanation helped with clearing up what could have been a very confusing and scary time.

This whole conversation made me think of recent events and the people that have died in recent months. Whether that is the awful events in Sydney, Glasgow or France, or simply the loss of family members such as Ryan’s mother back in September. We will all be touched by loss in our lives and this time of year can often open old wounds and remind us of those who are no longer in our lives.

Christmas, Yule, Hanukkah, or whatever other festivals (if any at all) that folk celebrate during the winter months are designed to bring people together. Yet the emphasis on family and close bonds can be distressing for those who do not have that idealised life. Religion, grief and trauma can make this time of year one of the hardest for many so spare a thought for them if you are fortunate enough to be spending a few days with your loved ones.

One positive death activity that can be carried out at this time of year is remembering our loved ones. Many more pagan practices focus on ancestor worship, and while Halloween is a great time for this sort of thing, winter holidays can also be a useful time to think back to those who have come before us. So rather than being overcome with sorrow and loss (even though these are important emotions and should never be hidden for the sake of others), think of those who are no longer around. Think of the good times that you have had together and when you are having your Christmas meal (or other appropriate feast), have a place set out with a photograph of your loved one(s) nearby so that they can celebrate with you, even if in your memory.

Everyone has different traditions and associations with this time of year, and I can only wish you a happy and peaceful time, whatever you’re doing. Keep being death positive and we thank you for your fantastic support over the past year!

Here’s to a good and productive new year!

Death in Cambridge: Dia de Muertos

We’ve featured Cambridge’s excellent Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology on Deathly Ponderings in the past because they do some excellent work and this month is no exception. While many Western countries tend to celebrate Halloween, Mexico (and parts of North America) celebrate Dia de Muertos.

The Museum displayed a wonderful Dia de Muertos altar space and we took some time to discuss the significance of its construction and the festival with a Mexican member of staff.

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Dia de Muertos

Celebrations start around the 28th October and reach their peak on 2nd November. It is a time for people to remember relatives, friends and ancestors in a celebratory way, with fun, laughter, music, food and music as opposed to the more sombre funeral rituals that many of us may be familiar with. The upbeat and rich Mexican tradition reflects the deeply held belief that no-one is truly dead until there isn’t anyone left alive to remember them.

Dia de Muertos has been celebrated for at least 3000 years and it brings together Aztec and Mayan religious traditions, with a more recent addition of Catholicism which was brought to Mexico by the Spanish conquistadors.

The altar

Traditionally, families will build an altar in their homes, with everyone taking part in decorating the space to honour their deceased relatives. Often altars will have three levels to represent the sky, earth and the underworld. The altars are then decorated with items, food and flowers that represent what the deceased enjoyed in life.

The lowest level is the first to be decorated. As a symbol of the underworld, flowers, candles and wood dust shapes are arranged to make a path or trail to guide the deceased’s soul to the altar.

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The middle level represents earth, or the world of the living. This is where the offerings and items that the person enjoyed in life are placed. These can include games, musical instruments, clothes, food, bread, drink and sweets. Food is often placed in baskets and traditional Mexican pots.

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The highest level represents the sky and is the spiritual level. A picture of the deceased is placed here with a glass of water and a cross made of salt or ashes.

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Activities

We were thrilled to see how many activities that the Museum were putting on over the Dia de Muertos festival period, from sugar skull mask making to storytelling for kids. They also had a small space for people to make tissue paper chrysanthemums, which are a traditional flower used on altars and represent death due to their flowering around the autumnal period.

We made two flowers for inclusion on the altar which was rather lovely, so we got to make our own ofrenda or offering to the person who the altar was made for: Gabriel García Márquez. The Columbian author died in April 2014 and was a national treasure for Mexico due to the fact that he spent a lot of his time there.

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Finishing off the day…Mexican style

To fully celebrate the ending of the wonderful Dia de Muertos festival (we had already celebrated Halloween in our own Celtic-tradition way), we thought we would support a local independent Mexican restaurant who do amazing burritos.

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We were thrilled to not only enjoy some amazing food, courtesy of Nanna Mexico, but we managed to get one of their last sugar skull cookies, as well as discovering an amazing altar on the upper floor of the restaurant space. The altar is dedicated to the original Nanna Mexico, Margarita, which was quite beautiful. Without her, Nanna Mexico wouldn’t exist and it is a truly special local secret of glorious food-based joy.

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Final bonus image: Nanna Mexico’s most central location has a wall of skulls in their stairwell. It is epic.

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Image credits: All images by Georgina. 
Text content greatly assisted on by MAA staff.

Deathly reading: Rest in Pieces

Book cover

Book cover

There are countless examples of people who have become far more famous after their deaths than they ever were in life. Edgar Allan Poe, Henry David Thoreau and Galileo Galilei are just a few who became (more) famous for their respective work even though they experienced very little of this fame while they were actually alive enough to benefit from it.

These names are just a handful of the various famous folk that are covered in Bess Lovejoy‘s excellent book Rest in Pieces: the curious fates of famous corpses which has just been published in the UK by Duckworth. The US version of the book has been hugely successful and it is easy to see why, especially with the exciting new addition of Richard III’s car park resting place tale.

Lovejoy has made the clever choice of categorising the various people that she writes about into themed chapters, ranging from the sensible Science and Medicine to the more intriguing Collectable Corpses. Each section is beautifully divided and illustrated by the utterly brilliant Mark Stutzman, who also did the book cover and inside covers, giving a wonderful overall reading experience.

You can dip in and out of this book quite easily, but Lovejoy’s engaging writing means that it is hard not to read the book in almost one sitting due to the inability to tear oneself away from finding out more astounding and truly peculiar facts about famous people that many will have had heard of, as well as those more niche individuals who still had fascinating tales to tell. Lovejoy is especially impressive with her ‘Body Politics’ chapter that covers not only Adolf Hitler and Eva Peron, but the more recently deceased Osama Bin Laden. When asked about this particular section, Lovejoy explained that:

“…if you’re going to talk about the history of famous corpses you have to take the bad as well as the good… the corpses of villains, like Bin Laden or Hitler, were actually some of the most interesting to me. I was interested to see how political regimes will go to some length to make sure there’s no shrine, no place for worshippers to gather, where the flame of their memory can be kept alive.” (Deathly Ponderings author interview)

Rest in Pieces is not just about the notoriously famous, it also covers those who had colourful lives and whose memory reflects that life such as Hunter S. Thompson, Lord Byron and LSD-advocate Timothy Leary. With additional tales of skulls being stolen by phrenologists, different body parts travelling across the globe, bodies going missing and remains being found again by pure chance, the heady and often confusing world of the dead is conveyed to the reader by Lovejoy through excellent research, writing and an obvious passion for finding out the truth to some of the more bizarre mysteries that surround certain peoples’ remains.

If you want to read about some of the most famous writers, philosophers, actors, scientists, politicians, composers and other historical figures, then this is the book for you. Not only will you discover new facts about these individuals’ lives, but you will also explore the often unknown and untold fates of their remains after they died. Often, these tales are far more fascinating than any biography of a person’s life ever could be and it sheds some light on the cult status and often crazy lengths that people have gone to to idolise, venerate and study the earthly remains of some of the great names of history.

Death in Cambridge: the Duckworth Laboratory

As soon as I saw this video, I knew we had to feature it as a Death in Cambridge post. I had no idea that the Duckworth Laboratory even existed! It is part of the Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies and contains amazing collections including skulls, skeletons, death masks, mummies and much more besides. Sadly it is not open to the public as a museum, but it is still an incredible research resource. In this video, you can watch Dr Ronika Power from the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology take you on a behind the scenes tour of this hidden deathly treasure: