We’re moving!

We thought we would experiment with new platforms and new discussions so…

We’ve passed on to the other side and are now on Tumblr! So follow us on there for all things deathly. Don’t forget, we still have our Facebook page so you can follow us on there too.

So thanks for being with us on WordPress and we look forward to continuing our deathly journey with you on Tumblr.

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Dead Social’s Digital Legacy conference

So we attended the rather excellent Digital Legacy conference which was run by Dead Social and hosted by UCL Partners in London on 23rd May. It was free to attend and we learned a huge amount about lots of different things such as, how people are using social media to mourn, what it’s like to go to a virtual wake and whether you should have a Digital Executor named in your will. This will be an annual event so if you missed it this time, keep an eye out for their 2016 event.

Because so much stuff was covered and some people were live-tweeting the talks, we thought we’d do something a little bit different this time around and create a Storify of the event. So…enjoy!

Feel free to ask any questions in the comments and we’ll try to answer them.

Click the image below to head to the Storify!

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Celebrating the season

This post was inspired by a quite beautiful conversation that I overheard on a public bus last night. A young girl was asking her mother about a friend of the family who had just died. The girl was confused as to what had happened and the mother was gently explaining how the friend had been ill for some time and that her dying was actually a relief for her.

The girl piped up: “So death is a good thing then?”

Her older sister interjected: “Not always…”

The mother settled things: “Sometimes it is the best thing, especially if someone is suffering. Someone dying can be a good thing and death isn’t always sad”

I’m paraphrasing a lot but in her wonderful education of her children, the mother used “death”, “dying” and “dead” multiple times, never relying on less clear words such as “passed on” or other euphemisms. Her young daughters listened in rapt attention and the younger sister seemed relieved and happy with the outcome of the family friend’s death. She obviously knew her well and her mother’s frank and simple explanation helped with clearing up what could have been a very confusing and scary time.

This whole conversation made me think of recent events and the people that have died in recent months. Whether that is the awful events in Sydney, Glasgow or France, or simply the loss of family members such as Ryan’s mother back in September. We will all be touched by loss in our lives and this time of year can often open old wounds and remind us of those who are no longer in our lives.

Christmas, Yule, Hanukkah, or whatever other festivals (if any at all) that folk celebrate during the winter months are designed to bring people together. Yet the emphasis on family and close bonds can be distressing for those who do not have that idealised life. Religion, grief and trauma can make this time of year one of the hardest for many so spare a thought for them if you are fortunate enough to be spending a few days with your loved ones.

One positive death activity that can be carried out at this time of year is remembering our loved ones. Many more pagan practices focus on ancestor worship, and while Halloween is a great time for this sort of thing, winter holidays can also be a useful time to think back to those who have come before us. So rather than being overcome with sorrow and loss (even though these are important emotions and should never be hidden for the sake of others), think of those who are no longer around. Think of the good times that you have had together and when you are having your Christmas meal (or other appropriate feast), have a place set out with a photograph of your loved one(s) nearby so that they can celebrate with you, even if in your memory.

Everyone has different traditions and associations with this time of year, and I can only wish you a happy and peaceful time, whatever you’re doing. Keep being death positive and we thank you for your fantastic support over the past year!

Here’s to a good and productive new year!

Death in Cambridge: Dia de Muertos

We’ve featured Cambridge’s excellent Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology on Deathly Ponderings in the past because they do some excellent work and this month is no exception. While many Western countries tend to celebrate Halloween, Mexico (and parts of North America) celebrate Dia de Muertos.

The Museum displayed a wonderful Dia de Muertos altar space and we took some time to discuss the significance of its construction and the festival with a Mexican member of staff.

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Dia de Muertos

Celebrations start around the 28th October and reach their peak on 2nd November. It is a time for people to remember relatives, friends and ancestors in a celebratory way, with fun, laughter, music, food and music as opposed to the more sombre funeral rituals that many of us may be familiar with. The upbeat and rich Mexican tradition reflects the deeply held belief that no-one is truly dead until there isn’t anyone left alive to remember them.

Dia de Muertos has been celebrated for at least 3000 years and it brings together Aztec and Mayan religious traditions, with a more recent addition of Catholicism which was brought to Mexico by the Spanish conquistadors.

The altar

Traditionally, families will build an altar in their homes, with everyone taking part in decorating the space to honour their deceased relatives. Often altars will have three levels to represent the sky, earth and the underworld. The altars are then decorated with items, food and flowers that represent what the deceased enjoyed in life.

The lowest level is the first to be decorated. As a symbol of the underworld, flowers, candles and wood dust shapes are arranged to make a path or trail to guide the deceased’s soul to the altar.

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The middle level represents earth, or the world of the living. This is where the offerings and items that the person enjoyed in life are placed. These can include games, musical instruments, clothes, food, bread, drink and sweets. Food is often placed in baskets and traditional Mexican pots.

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The highest level represents the sky and is the spiritual level. A picture of the deceased is placed here with a glass of water and a cross made of salt or ashes.

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Activities

We were thrilled to see how many activities that the Museum were putting on over the Dia de Muertos festival period, from sugar skull mask making to storytelling for kids. They also had a small space for people to make tissue paper chrysanthemums, which are a traditional flower used on altars and represent death due to their flowering around the autumnal period.

We made two flowers for inclusion on the altar which was rather lovely, so we got to make our own ofrenda or offering to the person who the altar was made for: Gabriel García Márquez. The Columbian author died in April 2014 and was a national treasure for Mexico due to the fact that he spent a lot of his time there.

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Finishing off the day…Mexican style

To fully celebrate the ending of the wonderful Dia de Muertos festival (we had already celebrated Halloween in our own Celtic-tradition way), we thought we would support a local independent Mexican restaurant who do amazing burritos.

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We were thrilled to not only enjoy some amazing food, courtesy of Nanna Mexico, but we managed to get one of their last sugar skull cookies, as well as discovering an amazing altar on the upper floor of the restaurant space. The altar is dedicated to the original Nanna Mexico, Margarita, which was quite beautiful. Without her, Nanna Mexico wouldn’t exist and it is a truly special local secret of glorious food-based joy.

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Final bonus image: Nanna Mexico’s most central location has a wall of skulls in their stairwell. It is epic.

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Image credits: All images by Georgina. 
Text content greatly assisted on by MAA staff.

Deathly reading: Rest in Pieces

Book cover

Book cover

There are countless examples of people who have become far more famous after their deaths than they ever were in life. Edgar Allan Poe, Henry David Thoreau and Galileo Galilei are just a few who became (more) famous for their respective work even though they experienced very little of this fame while they were actually alive enough to benefit from it.

These names are just a handful of the various famous folk that are covered in Bess Lovejoy‘s excellent book Rest in Pieces: the curious fates of famous corpses which has just been published in the UK by Duckworth. The US version of the book has been hugely successful and it is easy to see why, especially with the exciting new addition of Richard III’s car park resting place tale.

Lovejoy has made the clever choice of categorising the various people that she writes about into themed chapters, ranging from the sensible Science and Medicine to the more intriguing Collectable Corpses. Each section is beautifully divided and illustrated by the utterly brilliant Mark Stutzman, who also did the book cover and inside covers, giving a wonderful overall reading experience.

You can dip in and out of this book quite easily, but Lovejoy’s engaging writing means that it is hard not to read the book in almost one sitting due to the inability to tear oneself away from finding out more astounding and truly peculiar facts about famous people that many will have had heard of, as well as those more niche individuals who still had fascinating tales to tell. Lovejoy is especially impressive with her ‘Body Politics’ chapter that covers not only Adolf Hitler and Eva Peron, but the more recently deceased Osama Bin Laden. When asked about this particular section, Lovejoy explained that:

“…if you’re going to talk about the history of famous corpses you have to take the bad as well as the good… the corpses of villains, like Bin Laden or Hitler, were actually some of the most interesting to me. I was interested to see how political regimes will go to some length to make sure there’s no shrine, no place for worshippers to gather, where the flame of their memory can be kept alive.” (Deathly Ponderings author interview)

Rest in Pieces is not just about the notoriously famous, it also covers those who had colourful lives and whose memory reflects that life such as Hunter S. Thompson, Lord Byron and LSD-advocate Timothy Leary. With additional tales of skulls being stolen by phrenologists, different body parts travelling across the globe, bodies going missing and remains being found again by pure chance, the heady and often confusing world of the dead is conveyed to the reader by Lovejoy through excellent research, writing and an obvious passion for finding out the truth to some of the more bizarre mysteries that surround certain peoples’ remains.

If you want to read about some of the most famous writers, philosophers, actors, scientists, politicians, composers and other historical figures, then this is the book for you. Not only will you discover new facts about these individuals’ lives, but you will also explore the often unknown and untold fates of their remains after they died. Often, these tales are far more fascinating than any biography of a person’s life ever could be and it sheds some light on the cult status and often crazy lengths that people have gone to to idolise, venerate and study the earthly remains of some of the great names of history.

Author interview: Bess Lovejoy

Author Bess Lovejoy

Author Bess Lovejoy

We were delighted to be contacted by Bess Lovejoy’s publisher (Duckworth Publishers) to ask if we would be interested in interviewing her ahead of the UK release of her excellent book Rest in Pieces: The Curious Fates of Famous Corpses on 25th September 2014. Of course we said yes! I’ve already read the US edition of the book and know it to be a fantastic read. I will post a review of the book in the next few days so watch this space.

So we sat down with Bess (albeit at different computers situtated at different geographical locations halfway around the world from each other) and got down to business.

DP: Thanks for taking some time out of your busy schedule to answer some of our questions. So you have a new book coming out in the UK called Rest in Pieces: The Curious Fates of Famous Corpses and it is a fascinating read. What inspired you to write this book?

Bess: I used to work on a series called Schott’s Almanac, and we would spend a lot of time reading the news to try to find things to write about. In December 2008, a co-worker sent me a Guardian article about the painter Francis Bacon that really piqued my interest. According to the article, before Bacon died in 1992 he told a barman at the Colony Room Club in Soho, “When I’m dead, put me in a plastic bag and throw me in the gutter.” Bacon never actually ended in the gutter, but after he died a friend photographed him inside a plastic bag at the morgue. The photo became the centerpiece of a show used to raise money for the Colony Room Club, and that caused a bit of an uproar about bad taste, etc. A few days after that, the BBC ran articles about the pianist André Tchaikowsky, who willed his skull to the Royal Shakespearean Theatre Company, and people got very upset about that too. It got me wondering about the last wishes of famous people, particularly artistic people whom I admired. I started looking into those stories and quickly realized the most interesting stories were not about what people wanted to happen after they died, but what did happen. And then I realized that no one had collected a whole bunch of those stories in one book before.

DP: Doing the research for the book must have involved a lot of work and chasing down obscure references. How did you find the whole process and would you do it all again?

Bess: I loved it. I’m a research nerd, and finding out some of the facts in the book just filled me with sheer joy. I wrote most of it on the tenth floor of the Seattle Public Library, in their writers’ room, which was really a wonderful space. It was right above the floor for biographies, which was well-stocked, and I would start a lot of my research with whatever seemed to be the most authoritative biography of the individual in question and then follow their sources. If I had another idea for a project that I thought I would enjoy as much, and that I thought would be successful enough that I could convince publishers to back it, I would definitely do it again. Writing a book is gruelling and exhausting and lonely, but the day it came out was one of the happiest of my life.

DP: There are some truly wonderful and bizarre characters in this book, my personal favourite being Emanuel Swedenborg and his mysterious travelling skull. Which historical figure did you enjoy writing about the most?

Bess: Swedenborg was fun, although his story is extremely complicated. I’m glad it came out as being fun to read! I also really enjoyed writing about Rasputin. Those photos of him, with those eerie pale eyes, and all the mystery and intrigue in his story. There’s what people thought was happening with him and the czarina (sex) versus what was really happening (he was healing her haemophiliac son when he wouldn’t stop bleeding, but that was kept from the public). And the myth that he was so hard to kill, when in fact more recent research suggests died from a bullet wound, not after being thrown in the river. And of course, the idea of his penis being worshipped by some Russian émigrés in Paris and then going on display in a St. Petersburg proctology clinic—I mean, it doesn’t get much better than that.

DP: You definitely do not shy away from including controversial figures in this book, such as Adolf Hitler and the more recently deceased Osama Bin Laden. Did you feel it was important to include these individuals in the book and have you had any negative reactions as a result?

Bess: I think if you’re going to talk about the history of famous corpses you have to take the bad as well as the good. That doesn’t mean I approve of their actions while alive! I was just trying to get a 360-degree view of the phenomenon. And the corpses of villains, like Bin Laden or Hitler, were actually some of the most interesting to me. I was interested to see how political regimes will go to some length to make sure there’s no shrine, no place for worshippers to gather, where the flame of their memory can be kept alive. Because memory can be a political act. You have to be careful about what you let people remember.

DP: Were there any famous folk that you really wanted to include in the book but couldn’t for some reason?

Bess: I wanted to talk about Kurt Cobain, mostly because I came of age in Seattle in the 1990s, and I thought getting in a more modern rock star would be good. But most of Cobain’s story is bound up with Courtney Love’s version of things, and it’s pretty hard to fact-check.

DP: What do you hope people will get out of reading this brilliantly deathly collection of famous corpses?

Bess: Thanks for the kinds words. I hope it gives them some moments of delight, a delight mixed with a sense of wonder, or a delight that provokes a kind of curiosity. I hope it makes people realize that the way we now do death in the Western world is culturally specific—it hasn’t always been this way. And because it’s culturally specific, that means we get to choose how we want to do it, to some extent. People have more choice in these matters than they might think, particularly as society becomes more secular.

DP: Of course, your new book is not your first foray into the world of death and the macabre as you are a member of The Order of the Good Death and a founding member of Death Salon. Has your work with these two organisations helped you and your writing about what can often be a rather tricky subject area to most people?

Bess: I think so. The book came out in the US in March 2013, and I got involved in these groups while I was initially writing it. My involvement came naturally because of some of the conversations that were happening on Twitter, and it was very refreshing to find other, more-or-less young people who were having smart, fearless conversations about what it means to be mortal. That sounds heavy, but we were also having a lot of fun. And of course it was about finding other people who were delighting in the same kinds of macabre stories and facts that I was uncovering, who could appreciate them and also understand that sharing them doesn’t mean you have a mental disorder. People who understand that an interest in mortality is common and healthy, which is a message we want to convey to others.

DP: With your new book coming out, and the increase of a death positive movement seen through Death Salon, the popularity of death cafes and an increase in people simply talking more about death and dying, do you see the way in which we as a society perceive death changing in the coming years?

Bess: Definitely. At least in the US, we have a rapidly aging population, and one that is becoming more secular. We’re going to have a lot of dead people on our hands—we already do—and a society that is in many ways ill-equipped to deal with it. We lack the scripts that previous generations had to tell them how to deal with the dead and how to mourn, and so we’re making our own scripts, figuring it out as we go along. It’s just like the other changes that have happened since the social movements of the 60s and 70s; for decades now, many people have been re-thinking some fundamental ideas about things like birth, sex, family, work. Death is a part of all of that. Embalming is on its way out, natural burial is in, cremation rates are sky-high over here, cemeteries are overcrowded, and as you pointed out, people are having some real conversations about death in ways they haven’t before. But we probably need those conversations to continue spreading even more.

DP: The death community is certainly unlike any other that we’ve ever been involved with but we’ve found it to be one of support and friendship. What would you say is your favourite part of being involved in all things deathly, whether that’s through your writing or working with organisations such as Death Salon?

Bess: The community aspect is really important. And the community shares a lot of news and resources, which in turn feeds my writing and sometimes prevents me from getting too lonely. So everything works in a kind of symbiotic relationship. I think that actually my favourite part is being inspired by what other people come up with, and then seeing the impact they are having, and realizing that I’m privileged enough to know them!

DP: Having written a wonderfully successful book (I believe the US version was one of Amazon’s best books of 2013!), do you have any new and exciting projects planned?

Bess: I am working on an overly ambitious book about the state and history of death in America, and what changes in our relationship with death means. I might have bitten off more than I can chew! I really have no idea what will happen with it, but time will tell.

DP: Thank you for answering our questions and good luck with the UK release of Rest in Pieces.

Bess: Thank you!

——-

Thanks again to Bess for taking the time to talk to us. It was great fun and I hope you all go out and buy her book today! US folk…why haven’t you bought it already?

Book cover

Book cover

Going back home for death

Hi all, Georgina here. So for those of you who read Ryan’s last post, you will know that his mother recently passed away and it has fallen to us to sort everything out.

Since the last post, we have been manically busy hence the long silence on the blog. Thankfully Ryan’s mother did not have to have a postmortem but the various delays and other bits and pieces meant that her death was only registered last Monday. As soon as we knew that that was going to happen, we jumped on the next train to start sorting through things.

So far we have managed to get things going with a funeral director. Thankfully the chap in question knows the family and has helped with the funerals of Ryan’s grandparents so he was really easy to deal with and is taking care of so many things which is a huge help.

We are currently wading through a lifetime’s worth of paperwork and other bits and pieces, trying to get some semblance of understanding of what everything means. This ranges from bank accounts to electricity bills and everything in between.

Reassuringly, everyone that we have had to deal with so far has been massively helpful and things are moving slowly but surely which is good. It is just rather surreal coming back to Ryan’s home town to sort out something we didn’t think we’d have to deal with for a good few years yet.

So far, we’ve discovered that there isn’t a will which means everything is up in the air. However, we’ve managed to get a lot done without having to pay a solicitor which is surprising yet empowering.

Anyway, Ryan will write another post soon to fill you all in on how things are going from his perspective. I’ve just been kicking ass and taking names with regards to getting all the paperwork sorted as that is the sort of thing I’m good at. Working together on this is way easier than one person doing it all alone so my only advice at this stage is, if you’re having to arrange all of this sort of thing alone…try and get a friend or a relative to help you out and if possible, make sure that they are someone you can trust and that you get on well with. Tensions and emotions run high with this sort of thing, so knowing that the person who is helping you has your back the whole way is important.

Isles of Scilly (Part One): Modern burials

For those of you that follow this blog (and our Facebook page) regularly, you will know that we went on a much deserved holiday. We went to the Isles of Scilly, which are situated just off of the Cornwall coast. They are a five island (with lots of smaller islets) archipelago and are quite wonderful.

The islands have been inhabited in some form or another since the Stone Age and before sea levels rose the islands were more of a large mass of land that could be walked across. Once cut off, the only way to travel from isle to isle is by boat. The history of the land is evidenced by its ancient stone monuments, which will be written about in Part Two of this small Isles of Scilly special report series.

For Part One, I wanted to write about the modern burial sites that I had the chance to visit while on the islands. Some islands are more populated and settled that others, with the largest populated island being St Mary’s. We decided to walk around the island using one of its many coastal walks to visit Old Town (New Town is the other side of the island and is where the main hub of the island is, with its quay and residential area).

The walk itself was gorgeous with fabulous landscapes and rock formations.

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All we were expecting was to was visit Old Town and have a typically Cornish cream tea when we glanced behind us as we were coming off of the coastal path and spotted a small stone stile that led us unexpectedly to Old Town’s Norman-era church, with its gorgeous graveyard.

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Due to the islands being surrounded by the sea and having a big fishing/shipping culture as a result, many of the gravestones had anchors on them, something I had never seen before.

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All of the various stones and monuments were covered in the same types of lichen that we had seen on rocks overhanging cliff edges and near the sea, so it was lovely to see how nature was making a home among the stones.

One incredibly feature that we could not ignore was the absolutely enormous memorial to Augustus Smith, former governor of the Isles of Scilly during the 1800s. According to the plaque, the memorial had been built by the locals to commemorate the man. The memorial stands at an incredible height as you can see in the below image.

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This next image was taken from the opposite side of the quite substantial bay that Old Town sits in. You can see the enormous monument on the right-hand side with another one at the very top. We did not get a chance to see how this belonged to as it was quite difficult to get to and we did not want to disturb the stones too much.

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Another significant resident of this particular graveyard that we did not realise was there until we left was former Prime Minister Harold Wilson, who was buried there in 1995.

With around 530 registered shipwrecks around the Isles of Scilly, it is of not surprise that we also found dedications to many crews and passengers of ships that had sunk. One of the strangest (to me at least) people to be memorialised in this way was Ann Cargill, a British opera diva from London. Born around 1760, she reached a very celebrated status in no time at all, until her promising career was cut short when her ship wrecked while she was returning to England after performing in India in 1784.

The ‘young life cut short’ coverage and the news reports of how she was found floating in the water gripped the imaginations of the public, with her being portrayed as such a tragic figure.

I thought it was quite nice how the Isles of Scilly not only took care of their own, with many generations of estabilished Scillonian families being buried there, but they also looked after the poor souls who came from the outside and did not belong, but who died in their waters. Quite wonderful really.

While St Mary’s is the most populated and established island, graveyards are not limited to just that single place. Many, if not all, of the populated islands have at least a small church. We found a small graveyard on the considerably less populated Bryher island. At only 2 km long and with just over 70 inhabitants, this is the smallest of all the islands, yet its tiny graveyard is no less beautiful.

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If you ever have the chance to visit the islands, I would highly recommend it. They are gorgeous and like nothing else that I have ever experienced.

Until next time with Part Two…

 

 

Sunday Sundries 5

Hurrah! It’s that time of the week again and we know this is what you’ve all been waiting for. Another Sunday Sundries!

While not necessarily a new video, I rediscovered this in my bookmarks and wanted to share it with all of you lovely people. What a commendable project and a definite return to some of the old ways that have been lost in communities due to modernity and new generations moving away.

Next up, morticians doing magic tricks and chocolate-covered caskets? It can only be a fun funeral! Great article about the phenomenon from HuffPo.

From fun funerals to tasty ones, Death Salon’s own Sarah Troop has a wonderful article on Modern Loss, all about funerary food. Definitely one to make you feel peckish.

I’m fascinated by death and technology, especially how we discuss dying through social media. Here are two great resources: an article about live-tweeting a person’s death and a brilliant infographic about our ‘digital demise’ from DeadSoci.al.

Finally, something pretty. HT to Caitlin Doughty of The Order of the Good Death who shared this on Facebook earlier in the week. The picture comes with an interesting article too!

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Until next time, stay death positive!

Death in Cambridge: Egyptian burial care

Rather that highlight one particular artifact in this Death in Cambridge post, I wanted to show several. I think these items really show how the Egyptians engaged their dead in the burial process.

First up: the eyes

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These are an absolutely fascinating addition to the Egyptian box coffins and the accompanying labels describe that the motif is used so that the deceased can see out of the coffin. This is just one of many instances where the dead are seen as an active part of the process.

Next: the Shabti

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According to the signage, shabti (shawabti or ushabti) were small figures that were placed in tombs to ‘answer the call’ to perform various tasks on behalf of the deceased such as tilling or irrigating the land.

There are a wide assortment of types, such as the ones pictured, ranging from wooden to limestone version, with one even made out of faience which is a type of crushed quartz which is then glazed.

Following on from there: The burial of Khety

14029012112_d8da657ee6_kThese wonderful (if a bit blurry…working with an iPhone here) figures were found in the burial tomb of Khety in 1903.  The models are carrying out a mixture of tasks, such as running a granary and butchery in order to provide food and drink for Khety in the afterlife. Just off to the left-hand side, there are boats waiting to take Khety on a trip up the River Nile.

Finally: don’t lose your dead!

We’ve seen the stock image that represents a morgue a thousand times. A random pair of feet with a toe tag on them, making sure the deceased does not become separated from their documentation. This is by no means a new thing. The Egyptians used toe tags too, to ensure that their dead are accounted for.

14029207102_028f207c7e_kThese small wooden tags have the parentage, titles and age of the deceased written on them in demotic Greek and Egyptian. The ones pictured were for a pair of women. Tags were used to identify the deceased as cemeteries were often some distance from the family home of the deceased and so mix-ups could happen. So, definitely not a modern phenomenon by any stretch as these wooden tags date from around 30 BCE to 200 CE.

All of the items featured here are housed in the Fitzwilliam Museum as part of their extensive Ancient Egypt collection. I highly recommend a visit.